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Poverty Law
University of Minnesota and University of St. Thomas Schools of Law
© Poverty Law and Lawrence R. McDonough and Monica Bogucki (except where other authors are noted)
http://povertylaw.homestead.com
Permission granted for pro bono representation.
Use for other purposes, including educational purposes, is by written permission only from Lawrence R. McDonough and Monica Bogucki (except where other authors are noted).

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Poverty Law is a two-semester series of courses offered at the University of Minnesota School of Law, and former at the University of St. Thomas School of Law.

Poverty Law I covers the most common law poverty law issues which face private attorneys doing pro bono work for the poor, government attorneys advising state and local agencies offering poverty programs, and legal services attorneys.  Private attorneys doing pro bono work are by far the largest group of attorneys which provide legal services to the poor, so their education gives them a real advantage in understanding the area, as well as encouragement to take on work that is supported by the bar throughout the country.  The focus is on landlord-tenant, general government benefits, housing discrimination, and general elder law, as well as personalizing life in poverty.  Students help design a portion of the schedule to meet their needs.  The course uses a mixture of teaching techniques to allow for different learning styles of students.

Poverty Law II moves beyond basic poverty law to cover more specialized areas of poverty law often not covered in any detail in traditional law school courses, such as civil juvenile (i.e. child maltreatment and child welfare), advanced elder (i.e. kinship caregiving and nursing home regulation), advanced housing (i.e. mobile home parks and public and subsidized housing), advanced government benefits, disability, rural practice, immigration, education, and migrant law.  Students help design a portion of the schedule to meet their needs.  The course uses a mixture of teaching techniques to allow for different learning styles of students. It is strongly recommended that students take Poverty Law I before taking Poverty Law II, but it is not absolutely necessary.  There will not be an overlap for students who took Poverty Law I.

Poverty Law I generally is offered in the Fall, with Poverty Law II offered every other Spring.

Syllabus
Schedule

Lawrence McDonough
Pro Bono Counsel
Dorsey and Whitney, LLP
Suite 1500
50 South Sixth Street
Minneapolis, MN 554021498
P: 6124926795, F: 6126773220
McDonough.Lawrence@Dorsey.com
mcdon056@umn.edu
www.dorsey.com

© Poverty Law and Lawrence R. McDonough and Monica Bogucki (except where other authors are noted)
http://povertylaw.homestead.com
Permission granted for pro bono representation.
Use for other purposes, including educational purposes, is by written permission only from Lawrence R. McDonough and Monica Bogucki (except where other authors are noted).